Concare Blog for Concrete Floor Coating Customers



What are the Signs of Moisture in Concrete?

Flooring failures can occasionally be attributed to moisture in the concrete. If you are not sure if moisture is affecting your floor, here are a few signs that can be indicators.

moisture mitigation

Signs of moisture on bare concrete floors:

• Efflorescence. Efflorescence is a white powdery substance that appears on the surface of the floor or walls. the moisture makes its way up through the concrete and when it dries on the surface, it leaves a salt-like deposit behind. It can appear around crack or joints in the floor as they are a perfect exit point for moisture.

• Rubber Mat. A rubber mat, used at a workstation or an entryway, can be an indicator for moisture. If the rubber mat has been in that spot for more than 48 hours, lift it up and check if there is a dark discoloration left behind. If it's the same color as the bare concrete next to it, moisture may not be at elevated levels. If it's darker than the concrete around it, higher moisture may be present.

Signs of moisture under vinyl and coated concrete floors.

• Bubbles, Air Pockets. Moisture can appear as bubbles, air pockets or even elongated strands 4 to 12 inches in length. These areas will appear lighter, or it may be cracked with a liquid discharge.

Signs of moisture under carpet tile on the concrete floor:

• If the carpet tiles are loose, pick one up. If there's dampness underneath or if you notice that the adhesive is sticky, these are clear indications of moisture.

Hire a concrete floor coating expert like Concare who's ICRI Concrete Slab Moisture Testing Certified. Contact us at 866.CONCARE or 866.266.2273. Visit Concare at www.Concare.com.



When Does a Protective Wall Coating Make Sense?

Protective wall coatings are an instrumental part of your facility especially when bacterial growth is a concern. Here are the Top 3 Ways to Determine if a protective wall coating is needed:

wall protection

1. Sanitation is crucial. You've protected your floor with an anti-microbial coating (if not, contact Concare) however, splashing occurs during wash downs causing abrasive chemicals and detergents to land on the walls.

2. Moisture is a concern. Outside humidity comes to the inside. Protection generates heat increasing the humidity. Washing the floor and equipment adds more moisture.

3. Hitting the walls. Forklifts, falling objects, carts and gurneys are some of the more popular objects that frequently hit the walls at various impacts.

A Concare professional can help to determine the right wall protection, whether it be:

* A reinforced wall system

* A fiberglass strand system

Protective wall coatings are most often used in production areas, food manufacturing, pharmaceutical facilities, chemical plants, and hospitals to name a few. Areas where protective wall coverings are most used:

1. Heavy Duty Service

* Wash downs

* Steam rooms

* Sanitation

* Production

2. Cement Block / Concrete Block / Concrete

3. High Potential for Impact

4. High Potential for Pressure Wash

5. High Potential for Hot Water

Contact Concare today to have your walls and concrete floors evaluated for maximum protection. Ask for me personally at 708-681-8800 in IL (covers IL, IN, IA) or 920-746-0330 in WI (covers WI, MI).

When Does a Protective Wall Coating Make Sense?

Protective wall coatings are an instrumental part of your facility especially when bacterial growth is a concern. Here are the Top 3 Ways to Determine if a protective wall coating is needed:

1. Sanitation is crucial. You've protected your floor with an anti-microbial coating (if not, contact Concare) however, splashing occurs during wash downs causing abrasive chemicals and detergents to land on the walls.

2. Moisture is a concern. Outside humidity comes to the inside. Protection generates heat increasing the humidity. Washing the floor and equipment adds more moisture.

3. Hitting the walls. Forklifts, falling objects, carts and gurneys are some of the more popular objects that frequently hit the walls at various impacts.

A Concare professional can help to determine the right wall protection, whether it be:

wall protection

• A reinforced wall system

• A fiberglass strand system

Protective wall coatings are most often used in production areas, food manufacturing, pharmaceutical facilities, chemical plants, and hospitals to name a few. Areas where protective wall coverings are most used:

1. Heavy Duty Service

• Wash downs

• Steam rooms

• Sanitation

• Production

2. Cement Block / Concrete Block / Concrete

3. High Potential for Impact

4. High Potential for Pressure Wash

High Potential for Hot Water

Contact Concare today to have your walls and concrete floors evaluated for maximum protection. Ask for me personally at 708-681-8800 in IL (covers IL, IN, IA) or 920-746-0330 in WI (covers WI, MI).



Just Remember…the USDA Does Not "Approve" Flooring Products, Services or Currently Installed Floors

To begin, the USDA does NOT approve products, installation or methods of installation. The USDA utilizes field representatives that observe facility conditions and ask about products used at the particular location. After careful observation, the USDA inspector reports on the condition of the concrete floor.

usda compliant floorIf the food and beverage food and beverage plant is to be compliant with USDA standards, then the flooring needs to be:

• Non-porous

• Easily cleanable

• Free of cracks and joints

• Free of ponding water

• Free of harborage areas

• Sealed from floor to wall joints

• Contain a cove base (recommended)

Concare follows the USDA standards to ensure a compliant floor. We also use materials that conform to an inspector’s expectation for sanitation. Some manufacturer’s even go through the rigorous process of sending their product for inspection and approval through NSF International.

Our job is to support your efforts for a successful audit by the USDA. That’s why Concare takes on the added responsibility of being HACCP Trained, PCQI HARPC Trained, and Concrete Coating Inspector Certified. Being able to apply our training and experience is what we do to ensure a successful installation and audit for your concrete floors.



Choosing the Right Industrial Concrete Floor Company to Service Your Facility’s Floor

Your industrial concrete floor needs repair. However, you are not sure if it’s just repairs or if the entire floor needs to be done. You search the Internet for concrete coating companies, and choices are plentiful. However, how do you know if you’ve reached the right contractor for your project?

repair concrete floorWhen you place the call:

• Was the call answered by a live person?

• Did they ask you any questions beyond your name and number?

Next, this is surprising, but we hear it all the time.

• Was your call returned? Not just returned right away, or the next day…I’m talking…ever.

If you are lucky and it was returned:

• Did they ask you for further information?

• Did they ask about your business? Square feet? Issues you are experiencing? Budget? Timing?

Gathering this type of information helps to identify the right salesperson for the site visit.

If you would like to experience the Concare Way: lowest life cycle cost, done right and on-time, call Concare and ask for me personally at 708-681-8800 in IL (covers IL, IN, IA) or 920-746-0330 in WI (covers WI, MI).



What’s the Difference Between Concrete Painting & Concrete Coating?

Existing concrete floors often need a surface treatment for either visual appeal or to protect the concrete from damage. In order to determine the right solution, let’s first define the difference as they each have their own performance characteristics.

Concrete Painting

Concrete painting is typically used to make a concrete surface look clean and fresh. The process consists of cleaning, then painting the surface. Minimal preparation, but minimal performance, too.

Concrete Coating

Concrete coatings are high-performance flooring solutions formulated based on the environmental conditions of the facility or business. The purpose of a concrete coating is to protect the surface and hold up to abuse such as chemicals, hot water, forklifts, steel wheels and other factors.

Preparation depends on the existing floor surface. There are various preparation methods and each deliver a different result. Depending on the concrete floor’s current condition, a professional concrete coating installer, such as Concare, may recommend grinding, milling, scarifying, shaving / grooving or shot blasting. The preparation method is critical for the concrete coating to adhere to the concrete.

What’s Next

If you’re not sure which solution is best for you, give me a call or at one of our two locations: 708-681-8800 in IL (covers IL, IN, IA) or 920-746-0330 in WI (covers WI, MI) and we’ll visit your facility to conduct a thorough analysis of your concrete floor.



How to Prepare Your Facility for Concrete Floor Repairs in 5 Easy Steps

Preparing the space in your warehouse facility, distribution center or manufacturing plant for concrete floor repairs takes organization and time. Concare has put together a list of 5 steps to help make the process go quickly and smoothly.

1. Customer to clear the area(s) that need repair

2. Customer to direct pedestrian and/or forklift traffic away from the area(s) being worked on

3. Concare's repair crew will come in to repair any potholes, chips, joints and cracks

4. Based on materials used, Concare will let you know of any cure time necessary

5. Customer can put the newly repaired area back in use

Quick note on repair materials. All repairs are completed with high quality, resilient materials in order to accommodate any contraction or expansion. Cracks can move, meaning the concrete on one of the sides, shifts or moves. A high quality, flexible material will work to stop the crack in the concrete floor from progressing.

For further details on our repair methods, let me know and I'll send you our checklist and brochure.

Contact Concare today if you need to repair cracks, joints, chips, or potholes in your facility. Ask for me personally at 708-681-8800 in IL (covers IL, IN, IA) or 920-746-0330 in WI (covers WI, MI).